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Help a Beatlemaniac out?

Experience the evolution of the revolution.

The most extraordinary band to ever be, this blog is a small, clumsy journal of the marvellous past times the artists came to experience.

So here are The Beatles - The last great band in black and white


thateventuality:

Scans - The Beatles on the train heading to Washington D.C. from New York City’s Penn Station, 50 years ago today, 11 February 1964

Photos: Bill Eppridge




(Source: paulmcfruity)




(Source: paulmcfruity)




all-about-history:

Rare photos of The Beatles that will be featured in a book titled “Some Fun Tonight” which will be released February 7, 2014.

The photos were taken in Los Angeles, during a break in their final tour in August 1966. (Although the photo of John certainly doesn’t look like ‘66).




(Source: sapphirechicken)




(Source: sapphirechicken)







Paul McCartney with Wings, performing live in concert on the final Wings tour of the UK at Wembley Arena
London, England - 07 December 1979




(Source: thebeatals)




Paul McCartney, Estadio Azteca @ Mexico City

May 8th, 2012

Oh my goodness sorry to comment buT I WAS THERE I WAS RIGHT THERE IN THE SAME STADIUM AS PAUL IM GONNA-

(Source: allyouneedisgrohl)




The Beatles Live at Italy, 1965 (rare color footage)

(Source: smokeandthebeatles)




(Source: seeyoursunshine)







beatlesinnewyork:

February 8, 1964 in Central Park
The little girl was five year old Debbie Fyall and her father was a London Daily Express reporter following the Beatles on their first trip to America.
Excerpt from the Daily News, January 25, 2004 By Brian Harmon:

“I was a little scared because I couldn’t see my parents,” said Debbie, as she recalled that moment 40 years ago. “I saw the sea of camera lenses in front of me. Then I looked over and saw my father, who said, ‘It’s okay, I’m here.’”
Debbie, now 45, was tracked down this week by the Daily News when Capitol Records and Apple Corps Ltd. announced a search for her and other New Yorkers pictured during the Beatles’ first U.S. visit, in 1964.
A framed photo that captured what Debbie calls her “10 seconds of fame” hangs prominently in the kitchen of the home she shares with her husband and 8-year-old daughter in Alexandria, Virginia.
“I remember my parents in the morning saying, ‘Get dressed. We’re going to see the Beatles.’ And I didn’t really know what that meant. I remember John Lennon asking me my name and how old I was. He hoisted me up onto his shoulders. I was the only kid around at that point.”
“It’s always been a big part of my life. It’s been a great conversation piece,” she said of the picture. “People often do a double-take when they see it and say, ‘Is that really you?’” 

beatlesinnewyork:

February 8, 1964 in Central Park

The little girl was five year old Debbie Fyall and her father was a London Daily Express reporter following the Beatles on their first trip to America.

Excerpt from the Daily News, January 25, 2004 By Brian Harmon:

“I was a little scared because I couldn’t see my parents,” said Debbie, as she recalled that moment 40 years ago. “I saw the sea of camera lenses in front of me. Then I looked over and saw my father, who said, ‘It’s okay, I’m here.’”

Debbie, now 45, was tracked down this week by the Daily News when Capitol Records and Apple Corps Ltd. announced a search for her and other New Yorkers pictured during the Beatles’ first U.S. visit, in 1964.

A framed photo that captured what Debbie calls her “10 seconds of fame” hangs prominently in the kitchen of the home she shares with her husband and 8-year-old daughter in Alexandria, Virginia.

“I remember my parents in the morning saying, ‘Get dressed. We’re going to see the Beatles.’ And I didn’t really know what that meant. I remember John Lennon asking me my name and how old I was. He hoisted me up onto his shoulders. I was the only kid around at that point.”

“It’s always been a big part of my life. It’s been a great conversation piece,” she said of the picture. “People often do a double-take when they see it and say, ‘Is that really you?’” 




oobujoobu:

A section of the wall at the Ed Sullivan Theatre autographed by The Beatles, February 9, 1964

oobujoobu:

A section of the wall at the Ed Sullivan Theatre autographed by The Beatles, February 9, 1964

(Source: liverpoolecho.co.uk)