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Help a Beatlemaniac out?

Experience the evolution of the revolution.

The most extraordinary band to ever be, this blog is a small, clumsy journal of the marvellous past times the artists came to experience.

So here are The Beatles - The last great band in black and white


captainharrison:

taken from the original written lyrics to “here comes the sun”

captainharrison:

taken from the original written lyrics to “here comes the sun”




athousandvoicestalk:

In 1974, Jim Dawson sent John Lennon a questionnaire, asking for his thoughts on Buddy Holly. (A hat tip to a friend on Facebook for the link)

athousandvoicestalk:

In 1974, Jim Dawson sent John Lennon a questionnaire, asking for his thoughts on Buddy Holly.

(A hat tip to a friend on Facebook for the link)




osatokun:

Finally! I drew something looking like comics. aaand this is how I imagine beatles 8\ All about tits

osatokun:

Finally! I drew something looking like comics. 
aaand this is how I imagine beatles 8\ 
All about tits




beatledirt:

I Met The Walrus

In 1969, a 14-year-old Beatle fanatic named Jerry Levitan snuck into John Lennon’s hotel room in Toronto and convinced him to do an interview. 38 years later, Levitan, director Josh Raskin and illustrators James Braithwaite and Alex Kurina have collaborated to create an animated short film using the original interview recording as the soundtrack. A spellbinding vessel for Lennon’s boundless wit and timeless message, I Met the Walrus was nominated for the 2008 Academy Award for Animated Short and won the 2009 Emmy for ‘New Approaches’ (making it the first film to win an Emmy on behalf of the internet).




goingintodeepwater:

Today is the 52nd anniversary of Stuart Sutcliffe’s death, which prompts me to say a few things.
I’ve been blogging about Stu for four years.  My purpose in creating goingintodeepwater was to help dispel the faulty Sutcliffe image that shoddy journalists had embedded in Beatles mythology, and which equally lazy writers have continued to circulate.  Unfortunately, I still see the same stupid misperceptions repeated here on tumblr and other sites; still see the same stupid arguments being discussed (“was Stuart a bad bass player?”).
Sutcliffe fan fiction is often the worst offender, setting Stu up as shy and insecure, an unsure second-stringer.  This despite declarations to the contrary from every Sutcliffe contemporary, from Stuart’s own letters, and from the clear evidence of his behavior that proves he was confident, responsible, and mature way beyond his peers.  He was introverted, not shy; he was sensitive, not insecure (there’s a difference; look it up).  He knew what he was capable of: from an early age he understood he was gifted with an exceptionally brilliant mind and a fiery talent.  His dalliance with music was tangential to what he could and did accomplish as a visual artist.  
Speaking of music, Stuart was the eldest and steadiest member of a rag-tag group of novice musicians.  He had nerve, stamina, and courage (read about his struggle with bass guitar, and later, with debilitating illness).  He had the capacity to give freely of himself, was openly passionate and able to love without limit.
But old myths die hard—-no matter how erroneous.  I can only hope that current and future writers use their gray matter for more than dead paperweights holding down outdated material, and begin to realize—-and write about—-the extraordinary man Stuart Sutcliffe was.
Happy Deathday, Stu.
(portrait of Stuart Sutcliffe by stu-de-stael)

goingintodeepwater:

Today is the 52nd anniversary of Stuart Sutcliffe’s death, which prompts me to say a few things.

I’ve been blogging about Stu for four years.  My purpose in creating goingintodeepwater was to help dispel the faulty Sutcliffe image that shoddy journalists had embedded in Beatles mythology, and which equally lazy writers have continued to circulate.  Unfortunately, I still see the same stupid misperceptions repeated here on tumblr and other sites; still see the same stupid arguments being discussed (“was Stuart a bad bass player?”).

Sutcliffe fan fiction is often the worst offender, setting Stu up as shy and insecure, an unsure second-stringer.  This despite declarations to the contrary from every Sutcliffe contemporary, from Stuart’s own letters, and from the clear evidence of his behavior that proves he was confident, responsible, and mature way beyond his peers.  He was introverted, not shy; he was sensitive, not insecure (there’s a difference; look it up).  He knew what he was capable of: from an early age he understood he was gifted with an exceptionally brilliant mind and a fiery talent.  His dalliance with music was tangential to what he could and did accomplish as a visual artist. 

Speaking of music, Stuart was the eldest and steadiest member of a rag-tag group of novice musicians.  He had nerve, stamina, and courage (read about his struggle with bass guitar, and later, with debilitating illness).  He had the capacity to give freely of himself, was openly passionate and able to love without limit.

But old myths die hard—-no matter how erroneous.  I can only hope that current and future writers use their gray matter for more than dead paperweights holding down outdated material, and begin to realize—-and write about—-the extraordinary man Stuart Sutcliffe was.

Happy Deathday, Stu.

(portrait of Stuart Sutcliffe by stu-de-stael)




thebeatals:

John Lennon by Klaus Voormann

thebeatals:

John Lennon by Klaus Voormann




sillylovesongs:

onefinemorningg:

Chalk Festival in Pasadena

Fun fact: the Beatles chalk art above actually got first place in the festival! (source)

sillylovesongs:

onefinemorningg:

Chalk Festival in Pasadena

Fun fact: the Beatles chalk art above actually got first place in the festival! (source)




pbsdigitalstudios:

John Lennon and Yoko Ono talk about love in this lost, animated interview. 





Paul McCartney on the set of Magical Mystery Tour in 1967 playing his painted Rickenbacker 4001S bass.

Paul McCartney on the set of Magical Mystery Tour in 1967 playing his painted Rickenbacker 4001S bass.

(Source: ohh-darling-please-believe-mee)







spraymaalisielu:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAUL YOU BIG BABY!

spraymaalisielu:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAUL YOU BIG BABY!




nathotdog:

happy birthday ringo starr &lt;3 &lt;3 &lt;3

nathotdog:

happy birthday ringo starr <3 <3 <3




beatleing:

Beatleing…

beatleing:

Beatleing…




oldpaul:

happy birthday sir paul mccartney please come to brazil

oldpaul:

happy birthday sir paul mccartney please come to brazil




osatokun:

If you don’t want to draw your work,you can always draw uuussss Okay,someday I will learn how to draw Paul. 8\ 

osatokun:

If you don’t want to draw your work,you can always draw uuussss 

Okay,someday I will learn how to draw Paul. 8\